Basic Income #basicincome

The subject is all the rage in nerd blogs and progressive debates. But it’s a bit ridiculous how quick people are to forget history and get carried away with hype. Basic income (various versions of it, and much more along those lines) has been extensively debated and tried in real life for many years. It has serious pros and cons that mostly still hold, even in the world of (gasp) iphones and facebooks. There is a rich body of works and real-life data for anyone who cares to set aside a few dogmas and take an unbiased look around. Yet most vocal people just pretend like nothing of that kind has ever occurred, and the dumb humanity just never happened to think of trying out the groundbreaking Finnish new ways…

To all the gun lovers out there

In 2008, the U.S. had over 12 thousand firearm-related homicides. All of Japan experienced only 11

That’s 11 (eleven) incidents, three orders of magnitude less. Japan’s a bit under a half the size of US population.

The U.S. has the loosest gun laws and a gun homicide rate is 15 times higher than the rest of developed countries.

Nuff said. I love guns, rented from a licensed vendor at the range.

The LendingClub debacle: what does it mean from a lender’s perspective

Short-term: it means nothing. The sky isn’t falling and my adjusted return rate over 3 years is still 13.77%. And MMM et al are still collecting a sweet chunk of referral change for sending the general interwebs population in that direction.

Long-term: will see. Short of catastrophic operational disruption (which I don’t think is the case here), I expect things to move along the same way in this established business (ok, so the startup tag on this post looks pretty ridiculous by now, of course). The threat I’m still concerned about is some economic event which may cause people to default much more. But what will take the biggest hit in that case – equities, funds, real estate or peer-to-peer lending – is anyone’s guess.

Battle of the Grids: 10 ReactJS Grids and Tables

Had to whip up a quick UI for a project, and of course one of the key elements that always comes up is the paginateable, lazy, sortable (and maybe even filterable) table aka the grid. Without further ado, here are the contestants that emerged after some interwebs browsing. Me, I’m making an unoriginal choice to proceed with the most popular one.

component name gh stars gh forks npm april dl’s github npm
fixed-data-table 2377 342 53,209 link link
griddle 1365 241 21,388 link link
react-bootstrap-table 404 164 11,787 link link
reactable 853 134 9,870 link link
reactabular 231 55 2,701 link link
react-data-components 167 60 632 link link
react-table-select 4 1 234 link link
react-infinite-grid 96 19 215 link link
react-grid 0 0 145 link link
react-grid-table 65 18 50 link link

Bonus: here is how to also make fixed-data-table truly lazy and never download all of the bazillion rows into memory when you only need to display about 10.

Market is ūĚėīūĚėĶūĚė™ūĚė≠ūĚė≠ ~2x 2010 – do you believe avg company 2x richer than 2010? Bar hyperinflation, it has to correct more

Screen Shot 2016-02-13 at 1.43.19 AM

So I painfully moved to cash, bonds, money market and other assets throughout 2015. It was a very lonely and depressing experience, missing out on all those FBIOX gains (I know, right?) But I kept asking myself, do I really believe that all those S&P 500 big old dudes, the General Electrics, the¬†General Motors, IBMs, and Exxons. Do they make twice more money than 5 years ago? Hardly. So why all the craze? We don’t have a noticeable inflation, at least not in the consumer, non-real-estate space. S&P 500 is still almost 2x over 2010, give or take, even after the ongoing correction early in the year. There are no fundamental reasons for these companies to jump 2x in their market cap. Meaning, there might have been some other, non-fundamental reasons – perhaps¬†more speculative in nature – and now we still have some way to go…


The world outside tech bubble is crazy

In yesterday’s Bloomberg¬†article¬†with an upbeat¬†glass-half-full¬†original title of¬†“The mining industry¬†makes oil giants look great”, we see one of those CEO quotes that truly boggles the¬†mind. Apparently, if this continued for¬†33 months already, it’s probably¬†considered not so bad in the non-tech world.

… since he took on the role 33 months ago the company‚Äôs revenue had slumped by an average of $350 million a month.

Just curious,¬†how does a routine¬†conversation with the board/investors go then? “So, how are you guys doing?” – “Not so bad, focusing on our core competencies, pissing away $350 million a month, just like the last few years” – “Great, keep up the good work then!”

Stock #options exercise window – awesome!

A couple of years back, Sam Altman wrote¬†(paraphrase) that the 90-day stock option exercise window is complete bullshit which¬†adds to the nonsensical¬†ways startup employees get screwed over ¬†– as if¬†building a successful company wasn’t hard enough.

I’m really glad to see¬†the¬†sentiment is¬†getting heard, and yes, the startup employers need to be ¬†seriously reminded of this –¬†here on the webs, as well as during the employment and especially the offer negotiation. And companies that adopt sane options policies need to be praised. Zach Holman started a list of these¬†employee-friendly¬†outfits that I sure hope will grow over time. As of today, it is:

  • Amplitude
  • Asana
  • Clef
  • Coinbase
  • Expensify
  • GitLab
  • Persista
  • Pinterest
  • Quora

P.S. Bonus points Рwhen stock options suck and there is no way around that, here is a classic little post (not from me) on how to stop worrying and in 5 minutes maximize the deal you get for years to come.